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Becoming A Trend

Updated: Oct 9, 2018



'Mainstream'- the dominant trend in opinion, fashion, or the arts. (Dictionary, 2018)

Nothing in life should ever go unnoticed. Everyday, entrepreneurs are gambling to see if their ideas are worth an investment, and the truth is, anything can make its mark in the world with good branding. By adding creativity, even a simple pencil can go from practical to necessary.


Take smartphones for example, Apple, Samsung and LG. When each of these brands began releasing cellphones, they were true contenders to the average consumer. Each phone was similar in size, weight and special features. It was not until Apple began creating a distinct public image that cellphone users started to jump on its wave. It dates back to Apple’s first big ad, “1984,” that marks history as the first and most impactful ad, that did not show the product or logo until the very end. Apple was able to captivate consumers by building an image around its target audience that would undoubtedly persuade them to invest in its products. Since then, Apple’s ads have only gotten more influential, with their iconic “Think Different” campaign that launched in 1997 and has stuck with consumers, keeping their brand loyalty higher than ever. Just like that, Apple has maintained its loyalty with the largest public audience because it established itself, rather than its opponents who promote without influencing. Absolutely any brand could have done the same as Apple, but its marketing, branding, and influence is what separates it from the rest.


Any product can be influential, not just those that are newly released. That said, time-sensitivity is irrelevant for impactful branding, because a product does not have to die within a decade. Any product can become a lasting or recurring trend and as consumers, we see this especially often through romanticized vintage.


Though others may argue, successful branding is truly an equation. A brand releases a product, the product is marketed in a unique, creative, and impactful way, and, finally, the product is publicized in as many places and ways as possible. If any brand follows this, its product is bound to reach Apple’s level of prestige.


In addition, often times rebranding takes credit for a trend’s success. For example, skateboards started being used in the 1950s and were known as “sidewalk surfboards.” With time, they joined the mainstream, but were never in the spotlight. In 1999, pro skateboarder Tony Hawk made headlines as the first skater to land a “900” revolution trick, and this was the beginning of the skateboard’s rebranding. After his public debut, Hawk designed a video game that captivated young teens, and soon, skateboarding was a universal hobby, which gave brands like Element and Zero the opportunity to launch new products and campaigns. Eventually, Hawk’s efforts led to an even bigger reach, as Regina Luttrell defines in Social Media: How to Engage, Share, and Connect. Now, skateboarding is seen throughout the world on a daily basis. ‘Skateboard chic’ has even become a style that millennials dress.


The truth is, it’s not all about the product, its about good marketing and publicity. Anyone can come up with the same idea, but the idea’s execution is what captivates the public. With that, entrepreneurs’ biggest challenge shouldn’t be choosing an idea worth while, but instead a message they want to portray that will eave a lasting effect on consumers.

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